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20110701
20110731
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carry out india's worst militant attack since 2008? big dreams from a tiny island. one of the world's smallest countries hoping for olympic success. hello. it could be another landmark moment in the phone-hacking scandal. we should know very seen whether the media tycoon rupert murdoch has agreed to be questioned by members of british parliament. his son, james, and rebecca brooks have also been invited to appear before the hearing. we can go live to westminster. it feels like we're on the deadline hour for learning whether rupert murdoch is going to say yea or nay to appearing. i don't suppose many are expecting him to say oh, go on then. >> i don't think so. for one thing, the parliamentary committees do not have the same powers as congressional committees and certainly they cannot force foreign citizens like rupert and james murdoch to appear before them. there is even a question mark over whether they can really force rebecca brooks, who of course is a british citizen to appear. if anyone buzz does of the three, it is thought that perhaps she will be the most likely. the lawyers
as legal. ceremonies were held from manhattan to nighing a ray falls. >> last-minute captures on the big day. same-sex couples sweltering in the heat. >> with the celebration comes spending. it's thought same-sex marriages will boost the country by $3 million over the next three years. a handful of states have legalized same-sex marriage and new york is the one that will draw in the crowds. a destination in its own right. -- in its own rite. >> mark mattias had his cupcakes at the ready. his customers in this predominantly gay area of manhattan are now planning their weddings. >> roughly 50% of our business is weddings and we're expecting a big boost in revenue due to same-sex couples's weddings. >> the federal government here doesn't recognize these weddings. >> if one of us should pass away, the other cannot get social security and with regard to finances and taxes, we're not just treated the same as a heterosexual coup. >> whatever the picture at the national level, new york is welcoming same-sex couples with open arms, and after years of waiting, newlyweds are ready to throw the ulti
in three weeks the president continued to press for a big deal to raise the debt ceiling and to reduce the deficit by $4 trillion. >> i am still pushing for us to achieve a big deal. but what i also said to the group is if we can't do the biggest deal possible, then let's still be ambitious. let's still try to at least get a down payme on deficit reduction. we are obviously running out of time. and so what i have said to the members of congress is that you need over the next 24 to 36 hours to give me some sense of whayour plan is to get the debt ceiling rais through whatever mechanisms they can think about and show me a plan in tes of what you are doing for deficit and debt reduction. if they show me a serious plan, i'm readyo move. even if it requires some toh decisions on my part. and i'm hopeful that over the next couple of days 'll see this long jam broken because the american people i think understandably want toee washgton do its job. >> president obama ruled out a 2.4 trillion plan prosed by house republicans. >> in my expectation is that you will probably see the house vote on
have overinterpreted the mandate from 2010. so we will have a big debate in 2012. there's no question about that. and an important debate. but i'm not sure that the voters will resolve it finally so that whoever is in power in 2013 can be able to go in the direction that they say they wt to. >> if you don't get the debt problem resolved, he knows it's going to nip at his heels at ever turn, no longer how long he's president of the united states. that's the underlying problem. even if you get to that point, there's a disagreement, i think, ideologically about what the government's role ought to be in that kind of economic policy. >>e continue this evening the documentary filmmaker and photographer with interesting ideas, not only about filmmaking, but also interviewing. >> i don't think that i discover that isn't there already. i would, again, describe it differently. i would say it's a desire, not to impose some idea of what a person is like on the movie that i'm making, but a process of discovery, of trying to uncover, in some way, something new, something interesting, something vita
and protecting itself. >> to which one answer might be "so why is it so big?" i mean, it is a vast territorial power which has, of course, significant ethnic minorities. they have large territories. >> rose: so you're suggesting that there is a history of chinese imperialism and any other historian who suggests that... >> no, no. i think that henry kissinger is clearly right. that it is not an eansionist power inhe sense thatfor exame, russia was. expanding constantly but i think... >> rose: and certain after the war. >> but i think that what you see already is a chinese strategic doctrine and kissinger, i think, would not dispute this which stakes an ambitious claim to a spheref influence as we rightly said and that would provoke conflict so i i think we're entering very very difficult times >> rose: well, your oxford colleague neil ferguson suggests that nationalistic forces will overwhelm and that there will be a conflict between... in some way between the united states and china. >> well any historian who has looked at the history of the rise and fall of great powers would say such shifts
, materials. >> that money could make a big difference to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: high-level democrats and republicans alike said today's meeting at the white house marked the beginning of the end game in reaching a final deal on deficit reduction. the president and congressional leaders convened in the white house cabinet room, amid talk of a grand bargain involving social security, medicare and tax reform. when it was over, mr. obama made an unscheduled appearance in the briefing room. >> i thought it was a very constructive meeting. people were frank. we discussed the various options available to us. everybody re-confirmed the importance of completing our work and raising the debt limit ceiling so that the full faith and
every problem. that created problems for him. >> this is for the big attacks, like suicide attacks. are two major suicide attacks on me -- on my office -- there were two major suicide attacks me -oe -- on my office. >> are they still happening? >> taliban pou >> he came under fire from his allies -- taliban. >> he came under fire from his allies, too. there are reports that you support the taliban. >> that is in the past. >> never he did, -- whatever he did, ahmad wali was the point man for the allied forces. >> for more on the power vacuum the assassination leaves, i am joined by david ignatius. thank you for joining us. with ahmad wali karzai gone, who will fill his shoes? >> we do not know yet. the key strong man in this area of kandahar has been ahmad wali karzai. he said that wali karzai, who has been such a problem for the u.s. and coalition -- a corrupt or lower, -- corrup warlord -t d -- with him gone, they will look for somebody else, but it is not likely they can fill the role quickly. >> why did he say they worked too closely -- he worked to closely with the taliban? >>
brings another startling turn in this story. todas big turn was the dpe sigs by rupert and james murdoch james being his son and head of his british operations, to do 180-degree turn raer late in the day and having told the parliamentary committee that's going to hold a hearing on tuesday that they would not attend james murdoch saying ther loosely "i can't make it that day, i'll make it some other day. they then... summons were issued by the parliamentary committee which had fairly serious implications and they changed their minds. so we now know that come tuesday we will have the three principal executives that are in the frame on all of which, which is rurplt himself, his son, and rebek brooks who is the chief executive as you know of the murdoch subsidiary here in london being called to testify before parliament. catherine, where do you think the next term is in this story? >> well, john said it'saken a different turner. it's taking so many differen turns everyday that that's a really difficult questio i think that it is likely for the moment to stay focused on news international bec
think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: another blistering forecast greeted millions of americans today. the unrelenting hot weather broke a series of records, and triggered warnings in state after state. >> judging by the -- large portions of the country the sweating is way from over with temperatures over 100 degrees and above. >> how hot do you think it is. >> 109. >> in wichita, a high yesterday of 111 degrees, breaking a record set in 1982. it was expected to hit 103 today, the 20th straight day of t
a big difference to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: congress and the president labored again today to break the debt ceiling stalemate. there were conflicting signals, but no outward signs of movement. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> reporter: the u.s. capitol swirled today with claims of progress toward agreement on cutting the deficit and raising the government's borrowing limit. one report had it that house speaker john boehner and president obama were close to a major deal, but at the white house, press secretary jay carney quickly denied it. >> there is no deal. we are not close to a deal. we are-- obviously the president is in discussions with all the leaders of congress,
to be rescued. >> i was sleeping and heard a big sound. >> i suddenly heard a strange sound, like a large trade explosion sound, so i walked outside. -- like a large trade explosion. -- train explosion. >> they are calling it the worst rain in a century. hundreds of thousands -- hundreds of houses flooded. rhodes often impossible to accept with the health of rescue teams -- roads often impossible to pass except with the help of rescue teams. lucy williamson, bbc news, seoul, korea. >> tomorrow in london, more than 1000 british veterans who were exposed to nuclear testing in the 1950's and lost their case for damages will be hoping the supreme court will give them permission to appeal. the elderly veterans believe there ill health is due to exposure during the tests, but the ministry of defence has contested that claims since 2004. our correspondent reports. >> not until 10 seconds and could anybody in look. so intense was the man made sun that people miles away with their back turns and hands over their eyes are aware of its fantastic brilliance. >> basically, we had no protection, no warning.
. this is big for facebook. i do not know it is revolutionary for the user. >> all the people using facebook -- i understand a lot of people are deciding they do not want to use facebook. do they want to have a chat and video conferences? i thought that was more of their work scenario. >> with this audience, with any audience, this kind of video chat behavior is for the minority of your interactions. if you are in a certain place, once you introduce visual and audio cues, you have to have a controlled environment. i cannot do a video chat with you while i am on the bus going to work. that is complicated. i can always do a text chat. this is a rich interface for a minority of your communications. but facebook once those to happen within facebook, and not have you leave to use your skype program. >> i think i understand the technical side of this. one thing that seems to be clear from the business side is it comes in the same week that google announced its social network. it is trying to take on facebook as well. who is winning that battle? >> it depends how you measure it. on sheer numbers, n
.k. version of some big names. it's important to note the u.k. newspaper part of the empire only represents 4% of group sales. but if you look, for example, at the cost of news of the world, the profits they contribute and the weekday paper, the sun, it's about $138 million. for a global empire that makes hand in earnings about $3 billion a year, they can probably handle a loss in advertising revenue and readers. but they've also got the possible conference ensation coming up from the alleged victims of the phone hacking. sienna miller's phone was hacked and received a settlement of $160,000 u.s. dollars. if you multiply that times alleged victims, $32 million is what it comes closer to. we'll have a look at the european central bank. likely to go up with interest rates today. more on that coming up. >> state media in china dismiss reports a head has tied. culminating reports that said he was dead. from beijing is our correspondent. martin, what has been fueling all this speculation? >> well, these rumors started last week because he failed to show up to the celebration marking china's commun
. the journey ended in bakersfield. today, the big employers here are oil and farming, but the biggest employer of all by far, is the u.s. government, in the form of the military. when america boom, bakersfield. . -- when america boomed, b baker'so feel toomed. all across the south, there are the same basic problems, not enough credit to solve the housing market. >> general david petraeus is regarded as one of america's best and brightest. he's about to begin a new job as head of the cia. our diplomatic editor has been talking to general petraeus on his way home from afghanistan about america's longest war and other matters. >> nato forces in afghanistan have a new commander. general david petraeus is on the way home. he had been expected to serve longer but has been recalled to head the cia. the force he is leaving behind is now being quicker than he recommended. the insurgency has shown itself capable of hitting back with the assassinations and spectacular attacks. nato insists that they're winning. i asked the general what the possible grounds for optimism could be. >> what we have seen now
to take on our deficit is with a balanced approach. one where the wealthiest americans and big corporations pay their fair share too. >> reporter: meanwhile the leader of the democratic majority in the senate, harry reid, has been working on a competing proposal. it would raise the debt ceiling and cut $2.7 trillion in spending. the savings would come from federal agencies and defense spending but avoid controversial changes to entitlement programs and the u.s. tax code. >> so now all the republicans have to do is say yes. unfortunately, the republicans who used to run the congress on the caucuses are being driven by the radical, right wing that is so in tune with the tea party. they want their leaders to ignore the american people as they're doing. they want their leaders to ignore the business leaders like the chamber of commerce that they're ignoring. and even a majority of republicans around this country want something to happen and they're refusing to do that. >> reporter: this afternoon reid's plan got official endorsement from the white house spokesman describing it as a
of thing. >> yes, she made a big point in the hearings this afternoon saying she hadn'tbeen to downing street while david cameron was prime minister and contrasted it with the fac she'd been there a l under gordon brown and tony blair and the reason she hasn't been to downing street is she doesn't have to. they see each other ithe country side in the little village and easier to meethere an gng to downing street and have it in the papers. >> the solution to bad journalism has been more journalism and government has been far and ay bystanders and i don't think the committee hearing did a lot to change that. i think the lines of inquiry will continue to advance will come from the guardian and new york times and will come from the wall street journal and probably not from the mps of parliament. >> charlie: but including the wall street journal. >> wall street journal i thought was hilarious the other day saying there's an editorial saying you're all doing overkill there's so much and all hard-hitting. you have a $40 billion company to close a 168-year-old newspaper and ten people arrested
't you going against the policy that's in place where you're at?" >> smith: manning was taking a big risk. under the army's "don't ask, don't tell" rules, gay soldiers, like manning, were required to keep their sexual orientation secret. his friends also worried about his political activism. >> in his facebook profile, he posted signs and pictures at his presence at rallies. >> smith: gay rights rallies? >> right. this struck me as very dangerous to his position. i mean, i admired him for his... you know, for his courage on this, but i thought it might be a little bit foolhardy. >> smith: during this period, manning also started a relationship with a young man from upstate new york named tyler watkins. on weekends, bradley would visit him in boston, where watkins was studying. during those trips, the young intelligence analyst also found a new group of friends, computer science students and hackers. at the time, wikileaks was already making headlines, and julian assange was an admired figure among hackers. boston opened new doors for manning, but he had a problem back on base. >> he thoug
about a wall of dust as big as 80 kilometers wide in some areas. you can see it engulfing the city and causing havoc particularly foral flights. -- particularly for flights. going across much of the south western area. this ising? which can go from mid june right through september. that's the monsoon season itself. so more of this can be expected. but pretty extraordinary pictures coming in there. all sorts of things being brought down. among them, electricity wires, cables, you name it. it's quite a mess. right there in phoenix. >> now venezuelan president hugo chavez has leaders traveling to the area for the bicentennial celebration and using it as an opportunity to show support for hugo chavez from his cancer treatment. >> and prosecutors say the 25-year-old casey anthony smothered her daughter. first she said her child was kidnapped by a nanny then said she drowned in the swimming pool. the jury cleared her of the most serious charges. >> and barack obama says he wants to raise the credit limit and they have a limited time to prevent a u.s. from defaulting. >> now for some of u
disaffected members of his own party. there's no big mechanism, no easy mechanism for ousting him. so andy has e advantage of the holiday. all of this will have time to cooldown. ed milleband, he's right, he's made good progress, but the polls show that although there's been a kind of windy-danging to the tories, the labor has not picked up. the lib-dems, doing badly until now, have gained a little bit. people are not convinced by milleband. i think the relations between the parties remain pretty much unchanged, but ihink these problems have not gone away for cameron, they've just gone io the slightly longer grass, because the police now have until the fall to decide, for example, whether to lay charges. sohat could happen is that all of this could come back with a vengeance around the time of the annual party conferences. >> let's just break this into parts, charlie. the first , david cameron's short-term problem. and that is this question that his error of judgment in hiring mr. coulson. now, until this affair really broke, you could argue that david cameron led the strongest government in w
that that is a big if at this point but there are a lot of questions. i think the employees at news corp. media properties are nervous, shareholders are nervous. there are questions about what this means for the future of the company. a lot of questions i am hearing is where is the push stock -- the push back on rupert murdoch? shareholders have said this is like a family business, this is a public business. there needs to be strong vertex in place to make sure whether it is an independent board of directors, someone comes in and challenges rupert murdoch on some of these issues going forward. -- there needs to be some strong checks in place. i think that investors want to see that. >> thank you for joining us. president obama said that negotiations over the debt ceiling have reached the 11th hour. in a statement, he praised a new proposal that would cut 4 trillion dollars in the debt over 10 years through a mix of tax increases and spending cuts. israeli forces have stopped a french-flagged boat going toward the gaza strip in an attempt to break the blockade. the boat has now been taken to an
on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the firestorm over phone hacking in britain put media magnate rupert murdoch on the hot seat today before a committee of parliament. along with his son and a former top executive, murdoch faced close questioning, and a closer encounter with a pie plate. outside, the sidewalks were crowded with protesters against the murdochs and their newspapers, and british prime minister david cameron. inside, rupert murdoch was confronted by british lawmakers over allegations that his tabloids hacked the p
of pressure on a country's finances. it is a big worry indeed. of course, it is connected -- it is the mother of all contagions, it's connected to greece because the whole package to try to rescue greece has been delayed and delayed, and that is poisoning investors' confidence. but i'll have a lot more on the world business report in about 20 minutes' time. >> thanks very much. the bbc has learned that britain's culture secretary is writing to regulators for further advice on the implications of newscorp's planned bid for the broadcaster, bskyb. it comes in the wake of the "news of the world" phone hacking scandal o. sunday, rupert murdoch flew to london to guide the company through the crisis. >> it was all smiles as rebekah brooks and rupert murdoch left a restaurant last night. by allowing media access like this, news corporation is keen to convey a message that it's all business as usual. rebekah brooks stopped to help a photographer who fell over in the melee. it's understood she could soon be interviewed by police as a witness, though she says she knew nothing about phone hacking when s
's and suffers a lot of pain. getting his pain treated properly has made a big difference to both of them. >> his mood would change so quickly. never knew how he was going to be from -- not from day to day, but hour to hour. >> at this home they worked very hard to try to find alternatives to treating patients with antipsychotic drugs. today's story is prompting experts for doctors everywhere to speak much more carefully about whether so-called painkillers can be a better solution instead. jane hughes, bbc news. >> now in haiti it's been a year and a half since a devastating earth quake droyed the capital. 70,000 still live in camps and many face a daily struggle for survival. dr. paul farm are tells the story in his book "tatey after the earthquake." for decades he's worked to help the people from the island nation and recently discussed me to discuss their plight. doctor, thank you very much for joining us. you have been a champion for haiti for many years, long before the earthquake happened. and you described in your latest book the resilience and the suffering of the people there. what's the
important object. you know what that is, don't you? no. they were plugged into the speaking tubes in a big house. oh, right, the phone. so when somebody wanted to attract your attention upstairs, they would blow in the bottom end, and it would sound the whistle upstairs. they weren't for blowing into directly. a lot of people think they're actually whistles, but it was for attracting attention through a house. i call that one the "iron man" or "outward bound." what does that do? it's like a train whistle. i think that's it. we can't go any further; you've got too much. you're obsessive, aren't you? yes. they are a fantastic group. it belonged to my husband's great-aunt, and she travelled a lot. we think it might be indian but we're not at all sure. i can see exactly why you'd be thinking in terms of indian. you do get very much this sort of decoration appearing and, again, filigree work is a feature to be found there. what you've actually got is a travelling set. so the spoon, fork, and the knife. date wise... we're looking at about 1670. the spoon, with the sections cut at the top, that's
speaking, it's a big blow for the karzai administration. you know, it'sçç confidant, relatives, high-level aides going back into april some of them are being killed. but more than who is doing it or who it's happening to, i would put it altogether by saying it's a real danger for the stability of the government and it makes it seem as if as the americans and nato begin to pull out, it's really not clear who is in control. it's really not clear where these chips are going to fall. >> you wrote aboutç that ioç oe of the recent pieces for the post that the tenor of kabul is changing. people seem to be preparing for that day when the last u.s. troops are out of there and trying to figure out where the power is going to be. >> exactly. people are very nervous and scared. the last time a super power was involved in afghanistan and suddenly left, which was of course the soviet union in 1989, it wasn't long after that that civil wary rupted which was incredibly vicious and destructive and destroyed much of the capital. nobody thinks that's going to happen now but they're worriedç that s
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)